Oxcarbazepine Prices

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Compare Oxcarbazepine Prices

Dosage Package Price per pill, $ Price, $
150mgX30 30 0.97 29.10
150mgX60 60 0.77 46.20
300mgX30 30 1.43 42.90
300mgX60 60 1.13 67.80
600mgX30 30 3.37 101.10
600mgX60 60 2.68 160.80

Oxcarbazepine No Prescription

Oxcarbazepine is prescribed for use as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial seizures in adults with epilepsy and as adjunctive therapy in the treatment of partial seizures in children ages 4-16 with epilepsy.
Oxcarbazepine is prescribed alone or in combination with other prescriptions to treat certain types of seizures in people who have epilepsy. Oxcarbazepine is in a class of prescriptions called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal excitement in the brain.

Oxcarbazepine is structurally a derivative of carbamazepine, adding an extra oxygen atom to the benzylcarboxamide group. This difference helps reduce the impact on the liver of metabolizing the drug, and also prevents the serious forms of anemia occasionally associated with carbamazepine. Aside from this reduction in side effects, it is thought to have the same mechanism as carbamazepine - sodium channel inhibition - and is generally used to treat partial seizures in epileptic children and adults.

Oxcarbazepine Contraindications

Oxcarbazepine should not be used in patients with a known hypersensitivity to oxcarbazepine or to any of its components.

Oxcarbazepine Without a Prescription

Oxcarbazepine comes as a tablet and a suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 12 hours (twice a day). , with or without food. Take oxcarbazepine at around the same times every day.

Shake the suspension well right before each use to mix the prescription evenly. Use the oral dosing syringe that came with the prescription to withdraw the right amount of suspension from the bottle. You can swallow the suspension straight from the syringe, or you can mix it with a small glass of water and swallow the mixture. Wash the syringe with warm water and allow it to dry thoroughly after use.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of oxcarbazepine and gradually increase your dose, not more often than once every three days. If you were taking another prescription to treat your seizures and are switching to oxcarbazepine, your doctor may gradually decrease your dose of the other prescription while increasing your dose of oxcarbazepine. Follow these directions carefully and ask your doctor if you are not sure how much prescription you should take.

Oxcarbazepine may help control your seizures but will not cure your condition.

Oxcarbazepine is structurally a derivative of carbamazepine, adding an extra oxygen atom to the benzylcarboxamide group. This difference helps reduce the impact on the liver of metabolizing the drug, and also prevents the serious forms of anemia occasionally associated with carbamazepine. Aside from this reduction in side effects, it is thought to have the same mechanism as carbamazepine - sodium channel inhibition - and is generally used to treat the same conditions.

Oxcarbazepine Side Effects

Oxcarbazepine side effects that you should report to your health care professional or doctor as soon as possible:
- acne;
- back pain;
- bleeding from the rectum or blood in stools;
- bumps or blisters in the mouth, on skin, or genitals;
- changes in the way food tastes;
- chest pain;
- cold symptoms;
- confusion;
- constipation;
- decreased alertness;
- diarrhea;
- difficulty concentrating;
- difficulty coordinating movements;
- dizziness;
- double vision;
- drowsiness;
- dry mouth;
- earache;
- falling down;
- fast, repeating eye movements that you cannot control;
- fever;
- forgetfulness;
- headache;
- heartburn;
- hot flushes;
- increased , decreased , or painful urination;
- increased sweating;
- itching;
- joint pain;
- loss of appetite;
- mood swings;
- muscle weakness or sudden tightness;
- nervousness;
- nosebleed;
- rash;
- red or purple-colored blotches or dots on skin;
- red, irritated eyes;
- seizures that last longer or happen more often than in the past;
- shaking of a part of the body that you cannot control;
- slowed movements or thoughts;
- sore throat, cough, chills, and other signs of infection;
- speech problems;
- stomach pain;
- Swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs;
- swelling, redness, irritation, burning, or itching of the vagina;
- swollen glands in the neck or under the arms;
- toothache;
- unusual bruising or bleeding;
- unusual thirst;
- upset stomach;
- vision changes;
- vomiting;
- weakness;
- weight gain;
- white vaginal discharge;
- yellowing of the skin or eyes;
 
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